Periscope app potential grows as next social media giant

Mar 30, 2015 | Biz/Tech

periscope

Twitter Inc.’s Periscope app allows users to broadcast live streams of their daily lives.

By Christina Succi

The live-streaming app Periscope, recently acquired by Twitter, Inc., burst onto the social media scene this weekend with users broadcasting videos of the inside of their fridges.

Periscope is user-friendly and offers users a unique way to capture moments and enhance ‘story-telling’ on social media, which is why the app was quick to go viral.

“Imagine a video feed of the CN Tower live broadcasted to a child across the world, or I can get a 360 tour of Paris from my living room- the possibilities are endless.” – McLaughlin

What users find especially appealing is the potential to live-stream breaking news events. Two breaking news stories were broadcast within 24 hours of Pericope’s launch, including the collapse of a building in New York City’s East village.

“For the first time it’s possible for the non-tech savy person to broadcast live on the internet with ease to anyone who wants to watch them,” former client partner of Facebook Andrew Peebles  told Humber News.

The app has value in terms of enabling the broadcast of breaking news stories, social media expert Caleigh Alleyne said.

“I see the value in social media for communication in times of chaos by using it to connect people and the power of citizen journalism,” said Alleyne.

While Twitter has already been used as a platform to share information quickly, Periscope creates a whole new way to see the world, head of digital strategy at Herscu and Goldsilver Brock McLaughlin told Humber News in an e-mail.

“Imagine a video feed of the CN Tower live broadcasted to a child across the world, or I can get a 360 tour of Paris from my living room- the possibilities are endless” McLaughlin said. “Over fifty people have watched me sit at my desk and write out this very piece of Periscope.”

“It’s definitely in tune with the voyeuristic tendencies of our generation, but isn’t it a little creepy?” – Alleyne

There has been some debate on privacy issues with the app.

“It’s definitely in tune with the voyeuristic tendencies of our generation, but isn’t it a little creepy?” Alleyne said. “It adds to the Big Brother aspects of our society that we are trying to curb.”

Alleyne explains the potential of the app to be problematic for social media communities.

“We’re losing our privacy and society is expected to be ‘always on’, which I think is a problem when our self image is so highly influenced by public perceptions,” said Alleyne.

“As far as privacy goes, I feel the days of not being filmed or photographed are long over.” – McLaughlin

“I think this app will spark a larger question on the internet and personal privacy, especially with all the issues with cyber security and Bill C-51,” she said.

McLaughlin said Big Brother has already been operating in the same way for twenty years, and that it was only a matter of time before it became accessible to everyone.

“As far as privacy goes, I feel the days of not being filmed or photographed are long over,” he said in an email. “Everything exists online and we just have to accept it.”

McLaughlin told Humber News the app could be revolutionary for social media.

“If the app takes off like Twitter- and I truly believe it will- then we are in for a whole new type of entertainment,” said McLaughlin.