Ontario post-secondary tuition could rise five per cent

Published On March 4, 2013 | By HN Staff | News
By User:Matthewedwards (also User:Vidioman, User:Sémhur, and many others wrt the images this is derived from)Matthewedwards at en.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

A map of all the universities in Ontario. By User:Matthewedwards from Wikimedia Commons 

By Marco Di Meo

For the first time in seven years, post-secondary tuition in Ontario could see an increase of five per cent.

The Toronto Star reported on Sunday that The Council of Ontario Universities are arguing for a five per cent tuition increase to battle the lowest per-student grants in the country.

Post-secondary schools have cut $40 million in spending this year. Next year, the schools are being asked to cut double that cut to $80 million.

Director of Financial Services and Planning at Humber College Sanjan Puri said the new Minister of Training, Brad Duguid is in a tough position.

“I think there is an appetite to see a tuition decrease for students,” Puri told Humber News.

“Tuition only makes up 40-50 per cent of post-secondary school revenues, [Duguid] will have a lot of pressure because how will the government make up the difference of cutting grants without increasing tuition,” Puri said.

Despite the potential increase, the Canadian Federation of Students in Ontario is pushing for a 30 per cent tuition cut over three years, with 17 per cent cut in the first year.

Chairperson at CFS Ontario Sarah Jayne King told Humber News the tuition costs are unacceptable and an increase would only make matters worse.

“The [potential] increase is frustrating [because] tuition fees are out of control. The tuition costs really puts education out of reach for many Canadians,” King said.

“Students are seeking a high quality education and adequate funding towards post-secondary institutions and tuitions reduced,” King said.

Although a decision has yet to be reached, Duguid told the Toronto Star his goal is “to reach a balance that is fair to students, acceptable to post-secondary institutions and that focuses on ensuring both quality and affordability.”

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