‘Female Viagra’ approaches Canadian market

by | Nov 5, 2012 | News

by Jeanette Liu

If you can’t reach orgasm you might want to consider sticking a nasal spray up your nose.

According to a Huffington Post report, a ‘female Viagra’ could be hitting the Canadian market soon.

The new treatment comes almost 14 years after drug giant Pfizer’s Viagra, the pill used to treat erectile dysfunction, hit it big in the male market.

The new drug, Tefina, is aimed at women and comes in the form of a nasal spray.

It’s expected to boost sexual desires and heighten female arousal by activating parts of the brain that increase blood flow to the sexual organs.

The testosterone gel-based spray is expected to work for up to six hours after being administered.

Canadian pharmaceutical company Trimel, Tefina’s developer, recommends women take the treatment in teardrop sized doses up the nostrils two hours before peeling off their sexy negligee.

According to a report, 43 per cent of women suffer from some form of female orgasmic disorder.

“There’s definitely a market for this drug,” American sexologist and sex columnist, Jill McDevitt, told Humber News. “There are a lot of medical benefits to reaching orgasm. But mostly, you don’t catch people wanting to orgasm because it can help relieve pain or any of that. People want to orgasm because it just feels good.”

McDevitt also says while the drug might help some women, it’s also a disservice to others.

“This is a quick fix problem to reaching orgasm,” the sexpert said. “If women want to learn how to orgasm they should learn about their own bodies. They should masturbate and learn what works for them.”

Tefina is currently undergoing clinical testing in Austrailia, the United States and Canada.

Health Canada approved the trials and the tests will be running over the next month with women receiving the drug in their homes.

Side effects of Tefina have not been listed, but Dr. Stephen Dewit, a doctor of human sexuality, says women need to be weary of drugs they ingest in their system.

“I’m cautious of sexual enhancement solutions,” he said. “People need to be aware of what and why they’re taking something.”

The drug might not be for everyone though.

“I’d consider taking the drug when I’m older but not now,” second-year multi-media student Yukari Kawasaki, 22, told Humber News. “It’s a good idea because a lot of older people face this problem.”

 

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